What should I do if I have a bleeding mole or an itchy mole?

Bleeding moles can occur when they have been irritated or scratched – moles catching on clothing, being cut by a razor, makeup application, scratching an insect bite and hair removal are all very common triggers. However, a more serious concern for a bleeding mole is skin cancer.
There are definite signs that a mole could be a melanoma and individuals should seek immediate advice from a dermatologist. If you have a new mole or a change in your moles such as bleeding, changes in shape, size or colour, itchy or painful moles- it's imperative that you seek medical advice at the earliest possible stage.

Consumers should be vigilant in having moles checked annually or as advised by your dermatologist if you have a history of previously abnormal naevi (moles) or skin cancer. An early diagnosis is crucial in managing this potentially life-threatening disease; skin cancer which is detected and removed early is almost always curable. Just the tiniest of change in a mole is a sign to visit your dermatologist for a Mole Check.
The Cadogan Clinic offers a revolutionary Mole Package service which includes a mole and lesion check, removal and rapid histology results and advice. With a team of industry-leading consultants using the most cutting-edge techniques at the state-of-the-art facility, Cadogan Clinic's Mole Check is the only service of its kind to be approved by the British Skin Foundation.

The most effective way of monitoring moles at home is by regularly following the ABCDE rule. This is an excellent way of supporting annual mole checks with a medical professional. If you notice any of the signs below you should immediately seek medical advice.

A – Asymmetry Where one half of the mole does not match the other
B – Border Check the outline of your mole – a melanoma may have edges that are ragged, notched, blurred or irregular, plus the pigment may have spread into surrounding skin.
- Colour Is the colour uneven? You might see shades of black, brown and tan, or areas of white grey, red, pink or blue
- Diameter – Do you see a change in the size of your mole? Has it increased? Typically, melanomas are at least 6mm in diameter – (same size as the end of a pencil)
E – Evolving – Does the mole look different from the others and / or is changing in size, colour or shape?

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