These scars can be easily palpated as a lump and tend to be tender for a few months during the initial phase of the disease. 

Peyronie's Disease plaques cause loss of elasticity of the tunica of the penis and this reduces the capacity of the penis to stretch during erections. Patients therefore frequently report penile shortening and deformity such as curvature and narrowing of the shaft penis, which become visible during erections. In flaccidity the lumps can sill be palpated, but the deformity is not visible.
Peyronie's disease is frequently associated with other known cardiovascular risk factors, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, obesity and tobacco smoke. It is now established that more than 60% of patients have at least one known cardiovascular risk factor.

Worsening of the quality of the erections is quite common in patients with Peyronie's Disease; although this can be potentially caused by the plaque itself, as it allows the blood to be rushed out of the tunica of the penis, certainly also the cardiovascular risk factors play a role by causing obstruction to the arteries feeding the penis, thus reducing the blood inflow into this organ.
Since Peyronie's Disease can be associated with penile pain, shortening, deformity and worsening of the quality of the erection, it can be cause of severe distress in both the patient and the partner.

Frequently Asked Questions

Peyronie’s Disease is an acquired condition characterized by the formation of scars in the tunica albuginea of the penis. These scars can be easily palpated as a lump and tend to be tender for a few months during the initial phase of the disease.

Peyronie’s Disease plaques cause loss of elasticity of the tunica of the penis and this reduces the capacity of the penis to stretch during erections. Patients therefore frequently report penile shortening and deformity such as curvature and narrowing of the shaft penis, which become visible during erections. In flaccidity the lumps can still be palpated, but the deformity is not visible.

Peyronie’s disease is frequently associated with other known cardiovascular risk factors, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, obesity and tobacco smoke. It is now established that more than 60% of patients have at least one known cardiovascular risk factor.

Worsening of the quality of the erections is quite common in patients with Peyronie’s Disease; although this can be potentially caused by the plaque itself, as it allows the blood to be rushed out of the tunica of the penis, certainly also the cardiovascular risk factors play a role by causing obstruction to the arteries feeding the penis, thus reducing the blood inflow into this organ.

Since Peyronie’s Disease can be associated with penile pain, shortening, deformity and worsening of the quality of the erection, it can be cause of severe distress in both the patient and the partner.

At present, the actual mechanism causing Peyronie’s disease is still unknown. It is suspected that Peyronie’s Disease occurs in the genetically predisposed patient following trauma to the erect penis during sexual activity. It is believed that patients with Peyronie’s Disease present an imbalance in the factors that regulate the healing process following tissue damage and this leads to excessive local tissue proliferation.

Typically Peyronie’s Disease presents an initial acute and a chronic phase. The acute phase is characterized by the formation of the plaque, which is tender at palpation as there is an active local inflammatory process. During this phase, stretching of the plaques, as physiologically occurs during erections, elicits vivid pain. Plaque size and type of deformity tend to change over time during this phase. The chronic phase starts when the inflammatory process eventually settles, usually within 9 months from the onset of the condition. At this stage the pain generally settles and the deformity does not change any more in time. 

Peyronie’s Disease is a quite common condition as it affects around 10% of men. Although it is typically a condition of the fifth and sixth decade of life, Peyronie’s Disease can occur at any age. Usually in the adolescent the condition tends to be more aggressive in terms of size of the plaque and degree of deformity produced.

Potentially any male can develop Peyronie’s Disease, although the condition is more likely to occur in the fifth and sixth decade of life and in patients with cardiovascular risk factors.

Due to the strong link between Peyronie’s Disease and disease, patients presenting with this condition should always be actively screened for the known cardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes and high cholesterol levels.

The initial, acute phase of Peyronie’s Disease is usually characterized by the formation of a tender nodule on the tunica of the penis. Erections at this stage tend to be painful and patients usually notice a penile deformity, which, at this stage, still changes over time.

The inflammatory process progressively settles and this leaves a non-tender nodule on the tunica of the penis. At this stage erections are generally not painful and patients usually complain of penile shortening and deformity, which become apparent during erections. Many patients also report a progressive worsening of the quality of the erections.

Peyronie’s Disease diagnosis is based on history taking and on the examination of the patient. Frequently patients report that the disease has started following a trauma to the penis during sexual activity. Examination of the penis will demonstrate the presence of a lump, which can be elastic or indurated in texture.

Deformity can be assessed only during erections, when the tunica albuginea of the penis is stretched to its maximum capacity. Self-photography of the erect penis can be a useful tool to identify the nature of the deformity. However, this can underestimate the exact tridimensional extent of the curvature, as the picture is by definition bi-planar. Also, an incomplete erection will make the deformity appear less pronounced.

Alternatively, an artificial erection can be induced in the office with the administration of a vasoactive medication. This allows the surgeon to assess more precisely the tridimensional extent of the curvature and better plan the treatment options.

As patients with Peyronie’s Disease frequently have cardiovascular disease, which might have produced a degree of obstruction of the arteries feeding the penis, a thorough assessment of the penile blood supply should be carried out performing an Eco Colour Doppler Ultrasound Scan. This investigation will provide the surgeon with extremely precious information that will also help to better decide which is the most appropriate treatment option for each specific patient.

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What to expect

Free Consultation with one of our Patient Advisors

We offer a free, no-obligation 30-60 minute consultation with one of our Patient Advisors. They will work with you to understand your objectives and the results you want to achieve, talk you through the procedure and answer any questions you may have. If you decide that you would like to proceed to the next step and see a surgeon, your Patient Advisor will be happy to arrange this for you. At this point, you will be required to pay a consultation fee. 

Surgical Consultation

The next step is for you to meet your chosen surgeon at the Cadogan Clinic. Your surgeon will use this time to make a comprehensive medical assessment of you, your condition, and your expectations before making a recommendation and personalised treatment plan for you. You will then discuss the outcomes you can expect to see and ask any questions.

The Procedure

On the day of your procedure you will be welcomed at the Cadogan Clinic by your Patient Advisor and dedicated nursing staff. Following a brief medical check, you will meet with both your surgeon and anaesthetist to run through the details of your procedure one final time and answer any last questions you may have.  

Recovery

After the procedure, you will recover in the capable hands of our aftercare team. As we are a day-case facility you can expect your recovery to be complete within 2 to 3 hours. If your surgeon is happy with your results, you will be able to be discharged from the Clinic the very same day. In some cases patients may wish to stay locally in our exclusive partner hotel the day before or after your procedure in order to be close to their surgeon. Talk to us about these options if this is for you. 

After Care & Support

Our care and support continues in the days and weeks following your procedure with our complimentary aftercare programme. This comprised of a series of appointments made with your surgeon and nursing team to monitor your progress and recovery. They will also introduce you to several scar minimization techniques and bespoke products to aid your progress. Our team are also on call to answer any questions you have around your surgery at any time you are concerned.

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Mr. Giulio Garaffa
Mr. Giulio Garaffa

Uro-Andrologist

Considered one of the world leading experts in his fields of interest and is invited world wide to give lectures and perform live surgery